Attorney General Sessions: A Blunderbuss on Drug Policy

Rev. Alexander E. Sharp Harm Reduction, Medical Marijuana

It was evident before he was appointed Attorney General that Jefferson Sessions’ drug policies are ill-informed and wrong. It took watching his testimony before the Senate Intelligence Committee last Tuesday to understand just how this is the case. I had a “eureka” moment. He closed his statement with a self-serving peroration that had no relation to why he had been called before the Committee: “… Just last week, it was reported that overdose deaths in this country are rising faster than ever recorded. The murder rate is up over 10 percent—the largest increase since 1968. Together, we are telling the gangs, the cartels, the fraudsters, and the terrorists—we are coming after you. Every one of our citizens, no matter who they are or where they live, has the right to be safe in their homes and communities.”

Marijuana: Are Religious Values at Stake?

Rev. Alexander E. Sharp CT, Decriminalization, Legalization, Medical Marijuana, Tax and Regulate

It is good news that Connecticut may become the first state to legalize marijuana through the action of state legislators rather than by ballot initiative. On the morning of March 7, a new state coalition– Regulate Connecticut — held a press conference to launch a campaign to tax and regulate marijuana there. The Public Health Committee of the Connecticut House then held over 14 hours of hearings. In the press conference, I made the case that legalizing marijuana can, and should, be made on religious, not just secular grounds. This is not immediately obvious. It requires a closer look.

CA Ministers Speak Out Against War on Drugs

Rev. Saeed Richardson CA, Medical Marijuana, Protestant Perspectives, Tax and Regulate

Rev. Alan Jones, Pastor of St. Mark’s United Methodist Church, Sacramento and President of the California Council of Churches, joined by five clergy colleagues  (video below) calls for approval of  California’s Proposition 64 to tax and regulate marijuana.  Prop 64 passed with a 56% “Yes” vote. Transcript of Rev. Dr. Alan Jones statement: I believe that the basis of any Christian moral decision is being honest, so you start from the position of telling the truth about what’s going on. What’s going on is that people across California are using marijuana. I am told that on any street you can purchase marijuana. It’s illegal, but you can purchase it. There’s no law enforcement for it. This is a dishonest position. Proposition 64 calls us into an honest engagement with marijuana. You know, we Methodists used to be famous for the fact that we were required not to consume alcohol. Booze was a real problem and we had to say “no.” We’ve evolved over the years, and the United Methodist Social Principles now say concerning alcohol that” judicious use with deliberate and intentional restraint with Scripture as our guide” is the way to proceed. I would advise everybody as a person of faith looking at Prop 64 to consider “judicious use with deliberate and intentional restraint with Scripture as our guide.” And look primarily at the teaching of Jesus. Jesus when asked what the bottom line is, said,” Love God with all your heart, mind, soul, and strength; and love your neighbor as yourself.” And if you do that you, have to find your way into Prop 64. So let’s vote to support Prop 64.

Left Behind on Veterans Day

Rev. Saeed Richardson Medical Marijuana

  In moments of national conflict, perhaps nothing can be more devastating to a soldier than to be left behind. Sadly, as we approach the time of year to honor those who have faithfully served our country, this is the case for veterans suffering from chronic pain, PTSD, traumatic brain injuries, phantom limb syndrome, cancer, depression, and a host of other medical conditions. Veterans have been left behind, and their medical providers have no ability to advocate for them. Over one-half of our national population now lives a state that permit marijuana as medicine.  Ballot initiatives added four more on Election Day. Veterans are denied this service because the federal government continues to classify marijuana as a Schedule 1 drug with  “high abuse potential, no medical use.”