CA Ministers Speak Out Against War on Drugs

Rev. Saeed Richardson CA, Medical Marijuana, Protestant Perspectives, Tax and Regulate

Rev. Alan Jones, Pastor of St. Mark’s United Methodist Church, Sacramento and President of the California Council of Churches, joined by five clergy colleagues  (video below) calls for approval of  California’s Proposition 64 to tax and regulate marijuana.  Prop 64 passed with a 56% “Yes” vote. Transcript of Rev. Dr. Alan Jones statement: I believe that the basis of any Christian moral decision is being honest, so you start from the position of telling the truth about what’s going on. What’s going on is that people across California are using marijuana. I am told that on any street you can purchase marijuana. It’s illegal, but you can purchase it. There’s no law enforcement for it. This is a dishonest position. Proposition 64 calls us into an honest engagement with marijuana. You know, we Methodists used to be famous for the fact that we were required not to consume alcohol. Booze was a real problem and we had to say “no.” We’ve evolved over the years, and the United Methodist Social Principles now say concerning alcohol that” judicious use with deliberate and intentional restraint with Scripture as our guide” is the way to proceed. I would advise everybody as a person of faith looking at Prop 64 to consider “judicious use with deliberate and intentional restraint with Scripture as our guide.” And look primarily at the teaching of Jesus. Jesus when asked what the bottom line is, said,” Love God with all your heart, mind, soul, and strength; and love your neighbor as yourself.” And if you do that you, have to find your way into Prop 64. So let’s vote to support Prop 64.

Rule-Breaking and Radical Love

Rev. Katherine B. Ray Guest Pieces, Harm Reduction, Protestant Perspectives

A homeless shelter may be a refuge for those with no place to turn, but the entrance at its gate comes with a steep admission price:  “Turn in your LINK card.”  “Make your bed.”  “Attend religious services daily.”  “Stay sober.”  “Be in by curfew.” At the Harm Reduction in the House 2016 conference which I attended last Friday, two young people who had experienced homelessness could quickly rattle off lists of requirements.  These requirements mean that the choice to seek out a shelter or stay under the Wilson Street viaduct requires a careful cost and benefit analysis.  If staying out late with friends or smoking marijuana gives you the comfort you need in the face of loss and trauma, the trade-off for four walls and a roof may not be worth it.

The Criminal Christ: Finding Jesus Amidst A War on Drugs 

Rev. Katherine B. Ray Protestant Perspectives

“Theology and Peace” is an informal association of pastors, theologians, and lay people that seeks to advance the intellectual work of philosopher Rene Girard as the basis for transforming North American Christianity. On May 24-26, this group held its 9th annual conference in Northbrook, Illinois on the topic “People and Policing: Compassion for OUR Violence.” CNDP Project Coordinator Rev. Kathryn Ray offers the following reflection. “My son was about two years old.  I had taken him to the park to play… Two little boys, one blond-haired, the other red-headed, ran down to the car where my son was playing. Seeing them coming, my son immediately jumped out… The little red-headed boy… saw my son looking on… With all the venom that a seven- or eight-year-old boy could muster, he pointed his finger at my son and said, ‘You better stop looking at us, before I put you in jail where you belong. … At two years old my son was already viewed as a criminal.” (pp. 86-7) In her book Stand Your Ground: Black Bodies and the Justice of God, womanist theologian Kelly Brown Douglas shares this story to illustrate the depth to which the criminalization of African-American men and boys has permeated the American psyche. In 2012, a neighborhood watch captain singled out Trayvon Martin, an unarmed teenager, as “suspicious” character, pursued him, and killed him.  In acquitting his killer, the jury determined this characterization to be justified.  Trayvon Martin had not committed a crime. But like Kelly Brown Douglas’s son, he had been criminalized- he had been named “criminal” by another. The label led to his murder.

Marijuana in Rhode Island: An Open Letter to the Bishop

Rev. Katherine B. Ray Harm Reduction, Protestant Perspectives, Tax and Regulate

State legislators in Rhode Island are considering whether their state should become the fifth in the nation to legalize marijuana. On May 10, the Bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Providence, Thomas J. Tobin, issued a public commentary in opposition.  Rev. Alexander E. Sharp, Executive Director of Clergy for a New Drug Policy, offers this letter in response.

“Treating People Like Humans”: Another Reflection on Vancouver

Rev. Katherine B. Ray Harm Reduction, Protestant Perspectives

Our May 2 newsletter described the way in which harm reduction, including Insite, the only legal, supervised injection site in North America, can save lives and improve health. We offer the testimony of Rev. Edwin Robinson, Director of Urban Strategies and Live Free for Faith in Texas (part of the People’s National Network), who participated in this study tour to Vancouver, Canada on April 11-13.